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The anticipation of new year is powerful. Once it gets here though, you won’t magically have more time. You’ll have the same limitations next week as you have right now.

Getting a few days of progress under your belt – even if it’s not “perfect” – is a hugely powerful position to be in.

Can’t join a gym yet? Do some body weight movements at home.

Can’t afford to buy new books yet? Visit your local library.

Do what you can with what you’ve got. Refine the process as you go.

Shorten the time frame from one year to one week.

Starting the year with the intention to work out every single day is awesome – but if you’re not working out all that often now, this might be a step too far.

Instead, try your new habit for 7 days. If you’re successful for the week, keep it going for another week – then another. Soon you’ll have a whole month.

But just narrow your attention. It’s too much to think about what you’ll be doing a year from now.

People ask personal trainers often, “how can I be more motivated?”

Motivation is great – to get you started. But it’s not a long term strategy. Instead, you need a long term plan. Properly diarised intentions, with steps on how you’ll actually execute your plans.

Motivation isn’t a long term strategy – but you can rely on it to give you a really great starting week.

Health is the goal – directly or indirectly.

This is one of things that we all know but as soon as we get a bee in our bonnets about some other exciting project, it’s often the thing we sacrifice to chase the shiny thing.

In February/March of 2019 I got flu.

Really bad, proper flu. Not the 2-day man flu your colleagues called in sick with last week. It was horrific and felt nothing like I expected it to feel.

I was in bed for a full week, I couldn’t stay awake for more than about 20 minutes at time. I also had a urine infection at the same time that was spiking my temperature and stopping me from actually standing up, and gastritis attacks that were making me violently, painfully sick.

Those of you who know me, know how I feel about being sick.

It was horrendous. I am also entirely self employed so if I don’t work, I earn no money at all. I was also as weak as a kitten for about 6 months after it, which – given that I’m a personal trainer that does mostly strength work – was kind of a disaster. I remember the first week back in the gym I couldn’t even unrack the 20kg plates for my clients!

My point is: your health isn’t optional.

It’s not glamorous or sexy – and if you’re younger than 30 reading this, you probably couldn’t give a shit.

But that’s why we eat right, train in the gym, and prioritise sleep. It’s for health. If you’ve not got that, we’ve got big problems, because you can’t do any of the other stuff that’s got you all amped up.

Track it all – even (especially) the “failures”.

You’re a busy person with a lot of stuff on your mind. You can’t be expected to remember stuff.

At least, that’s what I tell everyone about why I can’t remember anything.

If you have a written record somewhere – on your phone in the notes, or even better – in a dedicated lovely notebook – you’ll be able to stay on top on what works for you. Perhaps more importantly – what doesn’t work for you and why.  

This is important because it will allow you to observe your behaviour through the perspective of an outsider.

You’re a scientist collecting data about behaviours that serve you and don’t serve you. This removes any sense of ‘blame’ about mistakes, and instead subtly shifts your mindset into thinking about course corrections in a neutral way. It’s a small, but powerful shift in focus.

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